Past Winners
 


THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2015 * * * 

FIRST AWARD TO:

THE CONSUL, THE TRAMP, AND AMERICA'S SWEETHEART by John Morogiello: On the eve of World War II, Georg Gyssling, the nazi consul to Hollywood, confronts Mary Pickford, the silent film star and co-founder of United Artists, to stop production on Charlie Chaplin’s controversial first talkie, The Great Dictator. Gyssling succeeds until war is declared and the movie is needed to buck up the allies.

JOHN MOROGIELLO: is a Playwright in Residence at the Maryland State Arts Council and a member of The Dramatists Guild. Plays include Engaging Shaw and Blame It On Beckett, both of which have been published by Samuel French. Other plays include Play Date, Stonewall’s Bust, Irish Authors Held Hostage, Men and Parts, Gianni Schicchi, and The Matchmaker’s Guide to Controlling the Elements. Happy Hour, a film adaptation of Men and Parts, was named Best Short Comedy at the 2003 New York Independent Film and Video Festival. Other awards include: 2015 Boomerang Fund for Artists Grant, The Kennedy Center Fellowship of the Americas, Holland New Voices Playwright Award (Great Plains Theatre Conference), Mountain Playhouse International Comedy Playwriting Award, and Baltimore Magazine’s “Best Up and Coming Playwright.”

SECOND AWARD TO:                                                                                      

THE WIDOW OF TOM’S HILL by Aleks Merilo: In 1918, the small coastal town of Tom’s Hill, Washington, awakens to find itself quarantined after the outbreak of a plague that would become known as the great influenza. When a solitary Sailor approaches the dock, the town elects to send Aideen, a 19-year-old widow, to liaison with him. The sailor’s cold manner is interrupted when he sees what Aiden carries: a newborn baby. What follows is a game of cat-and-mouse between two youths whose connection moves from compassion, to infatuation, to devastation.

Aleks Merilo of Portland, OR is a playwright and drama teacher there. His winning play for the BHTG is scheduled for production at 59E59 Theaters in NYC, Fall of 2015. Other plays include BLUR IN THE REAR VIEW, which won the James Rodgers Playwriting Contest and premiered at the University of Kentucky, Lexington and LITTLE MOSCOW, which won the Dubuque Playwriting Contest, performed at the Labute New Play Festival. His plays have been developed with the aide of The Furious Theater at the Pasadena Playhouse, Old Globe Theater, Portland Center Stage Fertile Ground Festival, Pittsburgh New Works Festival, Ross Valley Players, The Moving Arts Theater, Luna Stage, and Portland Readers Theater. He holds a BA in Theater, and an MFA in playwriting from The UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television


THIRD AWARD TO:

CORAL GABLES by Brian Raine: : In the late 1950s a young Polish war refugee wrote a bestselling book about her experiences. Now, after many years of sequestered living in Coral Gables, Florida, she has a collection of short stories ready for publication. Her daughter is determined to see the stories published, and has arranged a meeting with a literary agent from New York. But the elderly mother tends to wander off the subject, and could unwittingly reveal secrets that might unravel their carefully crafted facade.

Brian Raine of Burbank, CA has more than thirty years working in all phases of live theatre administration, including production budgeting, theatre management, marketing, advertising, special events promotion, subscription and sales. The author of 17 plays, he is at present working on a biography of Broadway composer Albert Hague, and a marketing work, Keep the Line Moving, addressing today's shifting audiences and way to hold them for the bows. He is a Board Member of the Santa Monica Theatre Guild, a member of the Dramatists Guild of America and the Alliance of Los Angeles Playwrights.

 

PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

* * * 2015 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

HOW I MET YOUR MUMMY by Todd Wallinger: The O. Howe Dulle Museum is about to unveil their latest find--a mysterious mummy named Yo-Wut-Sup--and everyone wants to get their hands on him! A pushy reporter vows to prove Yo-Wut-Sup is a hoax. A wacky mystic intends to sneak him back to Egypt. Three high school students want to use him in their low-budget horror film. And two clueless robbers plan to steal the mummy, if only they can figure out what one looks like. Can Melvin Trimble, the world's most cowardly security guard, stop them? Or will he be left taking the "wrap"?

Todd Wallinger of Colorado Springs, CO: Last year he also won the 2014 Marilyn Hall Award with his play, Rumpelstiltskin Private Eye. He has had more than 150 productions in 43 states plus Canada, Australia, South Korea and the UK. Five of his plays are published by Pioneer Drama Service. Kill the Critic! took 2nd place in the 2013 Robert J. Pickering Award for Playwriting Excellence and 2nd place in the 2013 McLaren Memorial Comedy Playwriting Competition. Long Tall Lester won the 2011 New Rocky Mountain Voices Competition. Todd teaches playwriting at the Colorado State Thespian Conference and serves with the Colorado Theatre Guild as a judge for their annual Henry Awards.

SECOND AWARD TO:

AT LIBERTY HALL by JAMES CHRISTY:
  The story of a teenage boy, Cristian, who is from the Dominican Republic, attending an inner-city school in New Jersey. His tenth grade history project is about Alexander Hamilton. Cristian is amazed to learn that Hamilton as a teenager also came from the islands and attended school in New Jersey, At Liberty Hall he visits the Hamilton room where he hides a letter in a desk. When he tries to retrieve it, he finds a letter from young Hamilton in 1773. They become pen pals spanning centuries as they communicate dreams, politics, girlfriends. Each boy is impacted by the other. This correspondence convinces Cristian to stay in school and, maybe, he might have a chance to apply to Princeton University.

James Christy of Princeton, NJ has plays that include NEVER TELL, produced by Broken Watch Theater and published by Playscripts; A GREAT WAR, finalist 2012 Julie Harris Playwrighting Award; LOVE AND COMMUNICATION: Playpenn Playwrights Conference, produced by Passage Theatre in October 2010, winner, the Brown Martin Barrymore Award in 2011. His play CREEP won Actors Theatre of Louisville’s Heideman Award for best short play in 2001. He is a member of The Dramatists Guild.

HONORABLE MENTION TO:

CHASING OPHELIA by Doug Schutte of Louisville, KY
THE BOX OF STORIES by Jessica Puller of Chicago IL
TOTALLY OKAY, RIGHT NOW by Madelyn Sergel of Gurnee, IL
THE MAGNIFICENT NINE by John Byrne of Albany, NY

THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2014 * * * 

FIRST AWARD TO:

IMAGE by Jack Rushen concerns a red-hot young celebrity who is rushed to the hospital from a drug overdose and is on the brink of death.  Her publicist can hold the story from breaking for only two hours and sees a money making opportunity by quickly acquiring her image rights from her protective mother with a deceptive contract full of loopholes. He quickly dispatches a tough female sales executive to get mother’s name on the dotted line.  The two women, both headstrong, engage in a volatile meeting, but eventually soften. The outcome is an understanding that human relationships are much more important than show business and stardom, transcending even death.

Jack Rushen of Stratford, CT is an actor, director, and playwright and celebrates more than 30 years working in stage, television, and film. His professional acting career began in Michael Moriarty's production of RICHARD III, which he performed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. He also appeared in several regional theatre productions, including THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON, ETHAN FROME and THE DOCTORS DILEMMA at New Haven’s esteemed Long Wharf, and at the Hartford Stage in ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA, under the direction of Mark Lamos. Jack is a member of the Emerging Artists Theatre in New York City, where several of his comedies and dramas have been produced.

SECOND AWARD TO:                                                                                      

THE SHABBOS GOY by Steven Peterson: It’s June 1967 in Chicago, and Morry Kaplan watches the world around him changing beyond recognition. Wars rage in the Middle East and Vietnam; his old Jewish neighborhood is migrating to the suburbs, and the 18-year-old boy who works in his synagogue as their “shabbos goy” caretaker is in desperate need of a father figure. But this boy already has a father, who wants his son to follow in his footsteps as a union barber. Can Morry give the boy a chance at a better life? Or is it the boy who can do the same for Morry? A single-set comedy-drama about learning the meaning of kindness.  

Steven Peterson of Chicago is the playwright and first-prize winner of last year’s Julie Harris Playwright Award for Affluence, to have its world premiere at Theatre 40 in Beverly Hills, September 2014. Recent productions of his plays include The Invasion of Skokie (Chicago Dramatists), A Couple of Nobodies (The Artistic Home), and Lydia Lindstrom (workshop production, Raven Theatre). Plays in development include Paris Time (Cleveland Play House, Theatre Ariel/Philadelphia) and Prodigal Brothers (Colorado Springs FAC Theatre). Steve is a Resident Playwright alumnus of Chicago Dramatists and member of the Dramatists Guild. Email: petersonplays@gmail.com  

THIRD AWARD TO:

GOOD by James McLindon: A poor but brilliant college student Tracy needs straight A’s to get into a top law school that will forgive her mountain of debt so she can be a lawyer for the poor.  With the economic odds stacked against her, she manages to rationalize her job writing terms papers for other wealthy students, including a lazy hockey player and a brilliant Chinese student who has not yet mastered English. So why is Tracy having difficulty sticking to the program?  We’re in a current age where personal integrity seems to be eroding. Each day seems to bring new headlines about politicians misspending their constituents’ money, footballs stars claiming to have fictitious girlfriends, or journalists making up the people they’ve been writing and winning awards about. The question is whether, in a world of privilege and deprivation, is cheating all that bad when done to level a playing field that is supposed to be flat in the first place?

James McLindon of Northampton, MA is a member of the Lark Play Development Center’s Monthly Meeting of the Minds and the Nylon Fusion Theatre Company in New York.  His plays have been produced or developed at theaters across America including the O’Neill National Playwrights Conference, Lark, PlayPenn, hotINK Festival, Irish Repertory, CAP21, Samuel French Festival, Victory Gardens, Hudson Stage Company, Abingdon, New Repertory, Lyric Stage, Detroit Rep, Great Plains Theatre Conference, Seven Devils,Telluride Playwrights Festival, Ashland New Plays Festival,Boston Playwrights Theatre, Colony Theatre, TheatricumBotanicum, Circus Theatricals, and Arkansas Rep.

 

PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

* * * 2014 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

RUMPELSTILTSKIN, PRIVATE EYE by Todd Wallinger: Fairy Tale Land has been hit by a crime wave. The Three Bears had their home broken into. The Three Little Pigs had their homes destroyed. Now Little Red Riding Hood's grandmother is missing. The crimes seem unrelated, at least if you listen to those shady Grimm brothers. Could an evil mastermind be behind them all? Only hard-boiled detective Rumpelstiltskin can crack this case.

Todd Wallinger of Colorado Springs, CO specializes in zany, fast-paced comedies. Three of his plays are published by Pioneer Drama Service. Long Tall Lester won the 2011 New Rocky Mountain Voices Competition. The Butler Did It! won the 2012 Cheyenne Little Theatre Players New Play Project. Kill the Critic! took 2nd place in the 2013 Robert J. Pickering Award for Playwriting Excellence and 2nd place in the 2013 McLaren Memorial Comedy Playwrighting Competition. Todd teaches playwrighting at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference and the Colorado State Thespian Conference and serves with the Colorado Theatre Guild as a judge for their annual Henry Awards.

SECOND AWARD TO:

PEDRITO’S ROAD
  by Norman A. Bert, based on the novels Pedrito’s World and Pedrito’s Road is a bilingual, realistic drama about coming of age.  In the mid-1940s, Pedrito, a poor Mexican-American kid, lobbies the near-by town to name a street after Pablo, a World War II hero.  Pedrito’s project triggers a conflict in town and, when threats mount against his supporters, he decides to give it up.  The idea, however, has taken on a life of its own and, although the street will not bear Pablo’s name, in the end Pedrito achieves an even bigger success. The play’s topics of immigration, Hispanic culture, and poverty intertwine in a positive, affirming, manner.  It is crucial that children of all racial and ethnic backgrounds encounter these issues that encourages acceptance of people of different ethnicities and economic status.

Norman A. Bert of Lubbock, TX teaches playwrighting at Texas Tech University. The 40-some play scripts he has written include Riders of the Golden Sphinx published by Baker’s Plays of Boston, America Shows Her Colors, selected for production by Inner Voices Social Issues (University of Illinois), Haboob, published by Arizona State University’s Canyon Voices, and Gunnin’ for Doggies, a finalist in the 2014 GunPlay(s) competition.  Bert has a strong interest in issues of poverty, equality,social justice, and ethnic diversity and is currently writing a collection of short plays for church use titled A New Corpus Christi. He has also written documentary film scripts and has published five books. Email:

HONORABLE MENTION TO:

Robin of Sherwood by Clara Harris & Andrew D. Harris
A Girl of the Limberlost by Marie Kohler
A Mini Comedie of Errors by M. Murphy Martell
Insomniac Society by Stacey Lane


2013


THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2013 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

AFFLUENCE by Steven Peterson is a dark comedy about greed and murder in a wealthy family during the Great Recession. It is the week after Christmas, 2010. The Woodley family has been hammered by financial collapse. And yet they see hope because Grandmother is dying and will leave them a fortune. There is one problem. Inheritance tax rates surge at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve, making it desirable for Grandmother to die now. What does a desperate family do? And, while we're at it, who else in the family is at risk once murder is considered? Affluence calls for six characters (2M4W), a single set, and a Christmas spirit gone awry.

Steven Peterson of Chicago has plays that include The Invasion of Skokie (produced by Chicago Dramatists, 2010, and ShPIel Performing Identity, 2013); Prodigal Brothers (Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Theatre New Play Festival, 2013); Mother's House (workshop production of Raven Theatre in Chicago, 2012); and Paris Time (winner of the Dorothy Silver Playwriting Competition with a staged reading at Cleveland Play House, 2012). He is a Resident Playwright alumnus of Chicago Dramatists and a member of The Dramatists Guild. Email:

SECOND AWARD TO:

US by Joe Sutton is a play about family.  But it is also, very much, a play about a generation; a unique, ambitious, politically-engaged generation, the Baby Boomers, and their kids.  In particular it’s about that moment when those kids begin to change and the parents no longer knows who they are. The parents get scared. In this case, the parents are Mark and Mary.  And after bombing out from college, their son Matt is now home with them. But now he’s an adult. As much as they want to help him, what they really need to do is let go. It's a painful process; one that reveals in each of them enormous weakness; as well as enormous love.

Joe Sutton of New London, NH has plays that include Voir Dire (nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the Best Play Award of the American Theatre Critics Association), As It Is In Heaven, The Third Army, and Restoring the Sun.  Theatres producing his plays include New York Theater Workshop, Long Wharf, Arena Stage, BAM, the Cleveland Play House, and the Old Globe. Most recently, his play Complicit (also a winner of a Beverly Hills Theater Guild award) opened at London’s Old Vic with Artistic Director Kevin Spacey directing. In addition, he has also developed a pilot for USA television called Scales of Justice.  He is a recipient of fellowships from NYFA, the NEA, and NJ Arts.  When not in rehearsal, Joe teaches playwriting at Dartmouth College. Email:

THIRD AWARD TO:

THE COMMISSION by David Clow.  Amidst Benjamin Franklin’s many achievements, history has forgotten a seemingly insignificant favor he did for King Louis XVI in 1785. In The Commission, Franklin tells the true story of the mysterious healer, Dr. Franz Anton Mesmer, who inspired awe among the people and fear among the leaders of pre-Revolutionary France. Mesmer introduces an element of social turmoil that the established powers cannot permit. Franklin agrees that Mesmer must be stopped. It is, Franklin confesses, a decision he has lived to regret. The Commission is based on primary sources including the rare original report of Franklin and his colleagues about Mesmer.

David Clow, a Los Angeles-based writer,  is the author of the non-fiction books Six Lessons for Six Sons - Six Lessons for Six Sons (Harmony, 2005; Three Rivers Press, 2006) and A Few Words from the Chair – A Patient Speaks to Dentists (CreateSpace, 2008), and the writer of the documentary series Understanding Cities. He writes regularly for Quest, The History of Spaceflight Quarterly. His play Witness Seven won First Prize in the 2013 One-Act Play Competition at the Little Theatre of Alexandria, Alexandria, VA. Email:

PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

* * * 2012-2013 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

THE CLUMSY PRINCESS by Jessica Puller and Joe Esher.  To amuse and delight the audience, a traveling troupe of performers tells the story of their king, unraveling how he became the great leader that he is today. The only problem with Prince Stephen is that to become king, he needs a princess.  Sadly, no princess measures up to his standard of perfection.  Desperate, Stephen and his loyal jester, Felicity, visit a witch he's imprisoned for being too ugly.  The witch reveals a princess who will be perfect for him.  Unfortunately, Princess Tilly, while beautiful, is hopelessly clumsy.  Stephen sends her away, but she trips, sending the two of them toppling out of a window and into the kingdom that Stephen has as a leader, ignored in favor of grooming himself.  As they travel back to the castle, they learn of a terrible beast that's been plaguing the people.  Stephen realizes that it's his duty to fight this beast and reclaim his land.  As he prepares to do so, he learns that there is much more to Tilly than her clumsiness.

Jessica Puller of Highland Park IL. graduated with departmental honors from the Northwestern University Theatre Program.  While there, her play "The Book of Dave" was a finalist in the Agnes Nixon Playwriting contest.  In 2008, her honors thesis, "Women Who Weave" won the unpublished play reading contest with the American Alliance for Theatre and Education and has subsequently been published by Playscripts, Inc.  In 2009, her play "The Creator" took first place in the Marilyn Hall Play Competition for Youth Theatre. She is affiliated with several theatres in the suburbs of Chicago, including Citadel Theatre and the Piccolo Theatre. Email: 

JOEL ESHER of Brooklyn, NY is a musician and teaching artist in New York City. He is the Regional Music Director of the Striking Viking Story Pirates (www.storypirates.org). Joel teaches children to compose original operas through the Metropolitan Opera Guild and gigs actively as an accompanist and music director for improvised musicals with The Magnet Theater, Baby Wants Candy, The Pit, and others. He has written music and lyrics for Folk Wandering (www.folkwandering.com) and his arrangement of "Evaporated" can be found on the album "Ben Folds Presents: University A Cappella." 

SECOND AWARD TO:

CATIE AND HEATH by Barbara Heimburger and Charles Lehnbeuter is a new take on Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights. Set in a high school, the show opens with the Drama Club’s waiting to rehearse its upcoming play. The students mirror their roles in the production. Catie (Catherine) is the self-centered heroine; Heath (Heathcliff) is the tortured orphan outcast; Hunter (Hindley) is the angry, spoiled brat; Ethan (Edgar) is the wealthy, yet weak, “nice guy”; Isabella (Isabella) is the girl who wants Catie’s man. When the students begin to rehearse, they assume the “classic” roles. After the rehearsal ends, they revert to their high school personae. Two endings are offered: will Catie follow her heart or her materialistic desires? You decide.

Barbara Heimburger of Rancho Mirage, CA taught literature and composition to high school students for thirty-three years. In 1991, she was a Walt Disney Company American Teacher Award Honoree for excellence in English. Her play, Lend Me Your Ears, won the 2011 Beverly HillsPlay Competition for Youth Theatre. Email:
 
Charles Lehnbeuter of St. Louis, MO has diverse business interests ranging from corporate acquisitions to creative writing. In 1995, he and Ms. Heimburger began their partnership. One of their current projects is a musical based on the 1911 theft of the Mona Lisa.

THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2011-2012 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

An American Execution by William Alewyn, is based on the trial and executions of Ethel & Julius Rosenberg. The play begins on the night of their execution, June 19, 1953, and moves through a series of flashbacks and flash forwards in time. It is a heroic love story and cautionary tale concerning those individuals who come in moral conflict with a changing political environment. In certain scenes the story returns to the trial and to the death row cells of the Rosenbergs. At times they appear from their graves to speak directly to the audience, as do several other historical characters in the play: David Greenglass, Roy Cohn, J. Edgar Hoover, Aaron Burr, Nathan Hale, George Eliot, and both a young and old Richard Nixon.

William Alewyn of Coolidge, Arizona is a playwright and novelist.  His short story "Venus" won the Best Fiction Award in Oasis Journal 2011. In 2008 his play Gedenken won the WSU School of Performing Arts National Playwriting Award, and in 2010 his play Cabin Fever was a finalist in the Mountain Playhouse Playwriting Contest. In 2007 his short story "Summer Vacations with My Father" was given the ASU/Jane Shaw Jacobs Award for fiction. He is currently writing a series of historical novels based on the comic misadventures of the illegitimate son of Christopher Columbus.

SECOND AWARD TO:

THE OBLITERATI by Kuros Charney: In a small country in the Horn of Africa, poverty and oppression have given rise to militant Islam. While jihadists close in on the capital, the reformist government led by Nadifa Hadad, widow of an assassinated prime minister, survives only with military aid from the United States. But a much-anticipated book by Dalmar Siddiqi, an exiled writer living in Paris, contains some damning information. After years as a political prisoner, Dalmar has written a massive tome exposing his country’s corruption, which Hadad fears will undo her fragile alliance with America and doom her government to seizure by violent fanatics. Hoping to stop the book’s publication, Hadad and her advisors make a clandestine trip to Paris. But Dalmar, has no intention of letting his literary masterpiece go unrecognized—igniting a philosophical battle with Hadad over the meaning of art, suffering, and the so-called clash of civilizations.

Kuros Charney of New York, NY has received productions and staged readings of his plays in New York and Los Angeles at the Stella Adler Theatre, Theatre Row, Urban Stages, the WorkShop Theater, the Coronet Theatre, the Elephant Theatre, the NEST, and the ALAP New Works Lab. He is the recipient of an Edward Albee Fellowship in playwriting, and has been a finalist for the Dorothy Silver Playwriting Award, the Susan Nims Distinguished Playwriting Award, and the Range View Playwriting Award. He teaches at William Paterson University and Gotham Writers’ Workshop. For more information, please visit www.kuroscharney.com 

THIRD AWARD TO:

JUDITH by Julian Olf: inspired by the apocryphal Book of Judith - an ancient story of the beautiful Israelite widow who, on the eve of her people’s destruction, interrupts her period of mourning, travels unarmed to the enemy camp, seduces their general, murders him, liberates her people, and returns to her period of mourning. The tale has captured the imagination of painters and poets throughout the ages.  The play wholly reinvents the characters, humanizes them, and engages them in action filled with suspense, humor and pathos.  At the center of the play stand the pitted adversaries, Judith and General Holofernes, whose dawning love is as inevitable as it is impossible.

Julian Olf of Leverett, MA directed theatre and taught playwriting at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His plays have been produced in New York, Boston, Los Angeles, Baton Rouge and Vancouver. His comedy, 1-900-Sex-Date, won the Nantucket Short Play Award.  His one-character play, (People Almost Always Smell Good In The Art Museum), was published by the Massachusetts Review and nominated for a Pushcart Prize.  His short play, Cat in a Box, appears in the 2011 Boston Theater Marathon XIII Anthology. His screenplay, Anthony, inspired by Shakespeare’s Hamlet, won a Gold Award at WorldFest International Film Festival.  www.umass.edu/theater/olf.php.

 

PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

* * * 2011-2012 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

THE BOY WHO BECAME BEN FRANKLIN by Ernie Joselovitz:  As recollected by his namesake, Uncle Ben, the young Ben Franklin, the youngest of eighteen children in a family of artisans, is punished for his inventive thinking that brings dismissal from his first two years at two different schools.  His father, frustrated in his good-hearted attempts to find a place for this rebel son of his, apprentices him for training under Ben’s strict older brother, the printer James.  The boy quickly masters printing skills, to which he adds a talent for writing.  Faced with abuse and repression, the teenaged Ben is determined to gain his independence and runs away.  His uncle arranges Ben’s escape.  Traveling alone, over unknown lands and stormy waterways, Ben arrives half-starved into the city of Philadelphia.  By the age of eighteen Ben has his own printing and publishing house, and is the most popular writer in Colonial America.

Ernie Joselovitz of Rockville, MD has received Best New Play awards in both Philadelphia (the “Barrymore”) and Metro D.C. (the “MacArthur”).  His plays have won numerous national and regional awards, and been produced in New York City and throughout the rest of the country.  Most recently, his adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped premiered at Peoples Light and Theatre Company (PA) and his musical libretto with songs by P.G. Wodehouse and Jerome Kern,”Til the Clouds Roll By,” was work shopped by the Round House Theatre Company.

SECOND AWARD TO: 

IPHICLES: A DRAMEDY by Nicole B. Adkins. It’s not easy being related to a demi-god. Just ask Iphicles. Everyone worships his brother Heracles - even after his rage results in the death of Iphicles’ beloved music mentor. Iphicles is determined to see Heracles punished at any cost, and the gods do love to meddle. As Iphicles travels to the Oracle to discover Heracles’ mortal weakness, Hera, Apollo, and Aphrodite strike a bet. Apollo prizes Iphicles’ musical talent, believing that his artistic nature will triumph. Hera has long resented Heracles, as one of Zeus’s infidelities, so this looks like the perfect opportunity for justice. Aphrodite arranges for Iphicles to meet a young woman, Meddy,. All ambitions collide in the second act, when Iphicles and Heracles return from their travels to a grand welcome home party for Heracles – including feasting and athletic games to honor the gods. Will art, revenge, or love win the day?

Nicole B. Adkins of Los Angeles, CA: Youth Program Coordinator and Playwright in Residence at SkyPilot Theatre in LA, she holds her MFA in Children’s Literature with an emphasis in playwriting from Hollins University. She has a BA in Theatre Arts from the University of Central Oklahoma, and studied Shakespeare at London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts. A playwright for youth and adults, Nicole has worked with children’s theatres as a performer and teacher for over a decade. She is a winner of the 2011 National Waldo M. and Grace C. Bonderman Playwriting Workshop. www.nicolebadkins.com

HONORABLE MENTION TO:

SOUL POSSESSION by Jessica Puller of Highland Park, Ill.

THE LUCKIEST GIRL BY Kitty Felde of Washington D.C.

 


2010-2011


 THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2010-2011 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

MARK TWAIN & LIVY by Joseph P. Ritz:  Mark Twain in his early thirties and new bride, Livy, set up housekeeping in Buffalo. Since he is an editor and feature writer for the Buffalo Newspaper, Mark’s father-in-law wants him to write a favorable article to the mine owners.  Mark quite mindful of his father-in –law’s loan to him does so against his better judgment.  Livy gives birth to a son and remains in frail health.  Her mother, who despises Mark, plots to move Livy and son away from him.  Mark gives up his chance for a steady job on the newspaper in order to write novels with humor.  Livy agrees with him, and they move away from Buffalo to build a home in Hartford to start a new life.

Joseph P. Ritz of Hamburg, NY has written several award winning plays, such as First Award-Christians in Family Arts.  His plays have been produced in New York at The American Place Theatre and The 87th Street Theatre.  He is a retired journalist and columnist for New Haven Courier Express and The Buffalo News.  He has a fellowship from the New York Foundation of the Arts.

SECOND AWARD TO:

DRONES by Matt Witten is about the men and women of the Air Force who sit in a trailer parker in Nevada and “pilot” unmanned aircraft that fly over Afghanistan and Pakistan.  With a touch of a button, they kill people eight thousand miles away. It's an extremely weird job, filled with emotional disconnects, moral ambiguities, and takeout pizza. On a larger level, the play deals with what robot warfare is doing/will do to our country and the world, and to the nature of war itself. If current trends hold up, in 30 years we won't have soldiers in the field, we'll just have robots fighting our wars.  This play addresses both the personal and political implications of this incredible phenomenon.

Matt Witten of Los Angeles, CA has been a TV writer for the past twelve years, writing for such shows as Law & Order, House, and Pretty Little Liars.  Before that he was a novelist and playwright.  He wrote four murder mysteries that were published by Signet.  His plays, including Washington Square Moves, The Deal, Sacred Journey, and The Ties That Bind have been produced at theatres throughout the country, including Primary Stages in New York, the Blue Heron Theatre in New York, the Huntington Theatre in Boston, the Philadelphia Festival Theatre, the Cricket Theatre in Minneapolis, and the New Mexico Repertory Theatre

THIRD AWARD TO:

CHIP OFF THE MOON by Bill Quigley:  is a family drama with a ferocious comic underbelly. Set in a working-class neighborhood in the Bronx in 1953, the play explores the disappointments and compromised dreams that often accompany middle-age.  Lucy Marino, who works six days a week in a baking factory, shares a modest apartment with husband, Marty, and Grace, her aging mother, who has no idea she’s battling dementia.  Grieving the loss of one son killed in World War II, Lucy has been estranged from her remaining son, Tommy.  Much to her disapproval and bewilderment, Tommy lives in Greenwich Village and consistently rebuffs his mother’s repeated and aggressive attempts to find him a girl. This play explores the eternal dynamics of parents and children, and how they differ in their expectations of one another.

Bill Quigley of New York, NY: A member of the HB Playwrights Unit, as well as a Playwright-In-Residence with the Bleecker Company, NYC, his play Don’t Ask, had its West Coast Premiere this past August at the New Conservatory Theatre Center in San Francisco; his full-length play, Tomorrow Morning, had its World Premiere in April at the HB Playwrights Theatre in NYC. Another full-length play, An Aeroplane As Far As Des­­­­­ Moines, is currently being work shopped by the Bleecker Company. He and collaborator, C.S. Drury, won the 2010 Alan Minieri Playwright Award for their play So Long Lives This.

PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

* * * 2010-2011 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

LEND ME YOUR EARS by Barbara Heimburger: A cast and crew prepare to shoot a TV episode of Roman Justice, a courtroom drama.  In this episode, Brutus and Cassius are on trial for the murder of Julius Caesar. The Soothsayer’s part has been cut because the actor wanted his role beefed up. Although angry to lose a star witness, the prosecutor forges ahead. The defense attorney manages to shred the various witnesses, especially Caesar’s wife and Caesar’s ghost. With a combination of 21st century vernacular, quotations from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, and humor, both sides make their cases for the conspirators’ guilt or innocence. And just as the jury begins its deliberation, the Soothsayer prances in and announces, “I’m back!”

Barbara Heimburger of Rancho Mirage, CA has an undergraduate degree from Harris Teachers College and two graduate degrees from Webster University in St. Louis. In 1991, she was a Walt Disney Company American Teacher Award Honoree in English. Years later, she and writing partner, Charles Lehnbeuter had The Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra perform selections from their first libretto, Wuthering Heights: The Musical. Stealing Mona Lisa, one of their current projects, tells the story of the 1911 theft of the “world’s most famous face.”

SECOND AWARD TO:

THE RAZZLE DAZZLE CAPER by Donna Gerdin; Fourteen-year-old Zoey Bloom works in an exotic bird shop. She and the birds are kidnapped by two thugs who work for a society milliner, Scarlet McCaw who plans to use the birds’ feathers in her colorful hat designs. In Scarlet’s dungeon Zoey and the birds plan their escape.  After several failed attempts, they realize that their only chance to break free depends upon their ability to cooperate with one another. That’s when Zoey and friends devise a plot to dazzle their captors and gain their freedom.  

Donna Gerdin of Oakton, VA holds a M.A. in English. In addition to writing plays, she teaches high school English and college composition classes in northern Virginia.  Her dark comedy Losing Lawrence was part of the Kennedy Center’s page-to-stage reading series and was selected by Centenary Stage Company for its Women Playwrights Series.  Following a world premier at Horizons Theatre, Losing Lawrence was published in 2008. Other award-winning plays include The Polka Dot Conspiracy and Wish You Were Her.  She is a founding member of the Playwrights Forum in Washington, D.C.

HONORABLE MENTION TO: 

ADEN’S MOTHER by Jessica Puller of Highland Park, IL.

BLUE WILLOW by Rose-Mary Harrington of Ashland, OR.

SWEET POISON by Jay Breckenridge of McKeesport,PA.
 


2009-2010


 THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD

* * * 2009-2010 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

REFUGE by Marc Kornblatt:  Two men meet on a secluded boardwalk along a marsh in a bird sanctuary in the Midwest.  Jim brings a notepad and a gun.  Laz brings a pile of pills and a six-pack of beer.  By the end of their first encounter, the pills are consumed and the gun goes off.  Both men live.  Jim and Laz meet again and again in the same place to argue, cajole, circle and embrace in a somber yet funny dance of death that also draws Jim’s burdened wife and Laz’s yearning girlfriend to the marsh to seek refuge and renewal.

Marc Kornblatt of Madison, WI began his theater career as an acting apprentice at Peterborough Playhouse in New Hampshire nearly four decades ago.  After college (Brandeis University), he moved to New York City where he appeared sporadically Off-Off Broadway and was seen, but rarely heard, in films directed by Woody Allen, Ken Russell, Walter Hill and Sylvester Stallone, among others.  Between acting jobs, he began writing plays.  He has worked as a newspaper reporter, earned a master’s degree in journalism (New York University), published seven children’s books and had plays produced in New York City, Los Angeles, Detroit, Memphis, Ft. Lauderdale and Madison, Wisconsin, where he lives with his wife and teaches elementary school.  

SECOND AWARD TO:

THE CARDIFF GIANT by Thomas Hischak:  In the 1860s, self-made businessman George Hull creates a giant statue and passes it off as a prehistoric man petrified to stone. The newspaperman Calvin Triplett breaks the story and soon thousands of people are paying as much as a dollar to look at the discovery.  Experts call the creature everything from a petrified man to a prehistoric statue to a total hoax. The notorious King of Humbug, Phineas T. Barnum, offers Hull $60,000 for the giant even though he knows it is a fake. Hull turns Barnum down so the showman has his own statue created and soon he is hawking it as the “original” giant and selling tickets to see his version in New York City.  Reporter Triplett stumbles across some evidence that the giant was manufactured by Hull and sets out to find the truth.  But do Americans want the truth? Or do they prefer a sensation?

Thomas Hischak of Cortland, New York is an internationally recognized scholar.  He is the author of twenty-five published plays and twenty-three books on American theatre, film, musical theatre, popular music, and movie musicals, including the award-winning “The Oxford Companion.” His plays are produced across the United States as well as in Canada and Great Britain.  He is Professor of Theatre at the State University of New York College at Cortland where he received the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activity in 2004.  He is also a Fulbright Scholar and has taught and directed American theatre and film in Greece.

THIRD AWARD TO:

FARINGDON FOLLIES: The Making of a Grand Eccentric by Bob Canning:  Based on the unconventional life of Lord Berners (1883-1950), composer, writer, painter and eccentric, Berners was influenced by some of the world's most creative, talented and quirky personalities of his time, and some (e.g., Noel Coward, Salvador Dali and Gertrude Stein) appear as characters in the play.  He enjoyed going through the town of Faringdon wearing a pig mask and frightening the villagers, blowing bubbles in restaurants, inviting a pet horse into the drawing room for his tea parties, while the fantail doves on his estate were hand-dyed every color of the rainbow, a tradition that continues to this day.  In 1935, the madcap Berners also built the last folly (or tower) in England, but it was for his music, books and paintings that he is best remembered.

Bob Canning of Petulama, CA studied comedy writing with Danny Simon (Neil’s brother), playwriting with Oliver Hailey and Doric Wilson, and musical theatre at the Lehman Engel Musical Theatre Workshop.  He was a writer for the Walt Disney Studios for 14 years and lived to tell about it.  He is a contributing writer for the Harper Collins book, “George Lucas's Blockbusting Movies,” which is now in its third printing.  On July 11, 2010, this play about Lord Berners will have a staged reading in the village of Faringdon, UK, to be headlined by well-known British stage and film actor Jeremy Bulloch.                                   

 PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

 * * * 2009-2010 * * *

FIRST AWARD TO:

YOUNG FREDERICK DOUGLASS by Walt Vail: In 1828, fourteen-year-old Frederick Douglass, then known as Freddy Bailey, is sent to Baltimore, Maryland as a companion slave to twelve-year-old Tommy Auld. There Freddy teaches himself to read and write.  He attempts to teach other slaves, gets in trouble and is re-assigned to plantation field work with a slavebreaker.  Beaten down at first, Freddy rises to defeat and to humiliate his slavebreaker.  After conspiring to escape slavery, Freddy is jailed, threatened with being sold down to Mississippi or possible death.  Three years later, he plans his freedom and, obtaining a free black sailor’s papers, finally escapes slavery forever by boarding a train to Baltimore.  He becomes one of America’s great leaders in the struggle to abolish slavery.

Walt Vail of Pitman, NJ earned a Master’s degree in Playwriting at Penn State.  He has been Literary Manager for Society Hill Playhouse in Philadelphia, and for Hedgerow Theatre in Pennsylvania.  He also acted in theatres in the Delaware Valley, PA area.  His play HATTIE’S DRESS was produced Off-Broadway in New York by The Open Eye: New Stagings.  Recent productions were done by The Vagabond Acting Troupe of Philadelphia and by Love Creek Productions of New York.  He is a lifetime member of the Philadelphia Dramatists Center, an active member of The National Dramatists Guild, and a recipient of a New Jersey Council on the Arts  Fellowship.

SECOND AWARD TO:

EROS AND PSYCHE by Jessica Puller:  When Aphrodite, the goddess of beauty, learns that she has competition with a moral girl named Psyche, she sends her son Eros to make Psyche fall in love with a pig so she'll roll around in the mud and no longer be quite so beautiful.  Eros, however, becomes very taken with the girl.  He is impressed by the way she rejects her suitors, not because of their wealth or fame, but because none are able to carry on a conversation.  Secretly Eros learns that Psyche is both intelligent and curious; precisely what he is looking for in a partner.  Determined to marry her, he makes her suitors fall in love with her sisters and has Psyche carried off to live in his golden palace.  There Psyche has everything she could ever want, but soon she learns her sisters are trying to steal her fortune, and Aphrodite is meddling with Eros' affairs. The love struck couple run amok in the palace.  Eros and Psyche must learn which is more powerful, love or jealousy.

Jessica Puller of Highland Parkk IL. graduated with departmental honors from the Northwestern University Theatre Program.  While there, her play "The Book of Dave" was a finalist in the Agnes Nixon Playwriting contest.  In 2008, her honors thesis, "Women Who Weave" won the unpublished play reading contest with the American Alliance for Theatre and Education and has subsequently been published by Playscripts, Inc.  In 2009, her play "The Creator" took first place in the Marilyn Hall Play Competition for Youth Theatre.  She is affiliated with several theatres in the suburbs of Chicago, including Citadel Theatre and the Piccolo Theatre.   Her website is at http://sites.google.com/site/jessicapullersportfolio/home

HONORABLE MENTION TO:

MONSTERS?  LOST AND FOUND by Barbara Ashley of  Laguna Woods, CA

Comedy Suitable for Middle School (Grades 6- 8).
 


WINNERS FOR 2007


 

 THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD COMPETITION

 FIRST AWARD TO:

In the Middle of Nowhere by Kent R. Brown of Fairfield, Connecticut.  In rural Nebraska, Rebecca and Lucas Pender, a loving couple in their upper years, stand transfixed as they witness the collapse of the Twin Towers.  Insidiously, the trauma of 9/11 begins to unleash a Pandora’s Box of repressed fears hidden deep within Rebecca’s psyche.  She loses weight, sanitizes the house; even prowls gun shops and military surplus stores. She refuses psychological assistance. Lucas is frantic. He loves her desperately, can’t envision life without her. So, together, they stockpile food supplies and weapons, and build an underground shelter. Finally, a believer now, Lucas stands in their front yard -- flashlight in one hand, shotgun in the other -- ready to defend his homestead against the impending Armageddon that will surely come.

Kent R. Brown is a retired professor of drama at the University of Arkansas and a former adjunct professor at Fairfield University.  His works have been produced by People’s Light and Theatre Company, Walnut Street Theatre, BoarsHead Theatre, West Coast Ensemble, Boston Theatre Works, Pulse Ensemble, Moving Arts and other theatres in the United States, Belgium and Canada.  Awards include: Norfolk Southern /Mill Mountain, McLaren Comedy, Boston Theatre Marathon,  Drama-Logue and Denver Center Theatre awards. Kent is a member of The Dramatists Guild.  kentrbrown@aol.com.

SECOND AWARD TO:

COMPLICIT by Joe Sutton of Montclair, NJ.  A play about the liberal media and the war on terror.  A Pulitzer Prize winning journalist is being hauled in front of a special prosecutor and threatened with the Espionage Act for revealing secrets about the CIA black sites.  What makes his circumstances more poignant, he once wrote a column suggesting we could no longer be squeamish about torture.  In the days after 9/11 we couldn’t “afford “ to be.  He comes to regret that column and, now facing a grand jury, he’s confronting another ethical choice—whether or not to give up his source with the CIA story.

Joe Sutton’s provocative plays about politics, race and other topical issues include Voir Dire nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the Best Play award of the American Theatre Critics Association.  His works have been produced by BAM, Arena Stage, the Cleveland Play House, and the Old Globe.  Honors and awards are the FDG/CBS playwrighting award, the Joe A. Calloway Award and fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.   He is also teaches playwrighting at Dartmouth College.

THIRD AWARD TO:

THE FAULT LINE by Frederic Glover of Brooklyn, NY.  A dark comedy set in Berkeley, California in the present.  A middle-aged couple, both attorneys, whose once loving marriage is now falling apart due to the husband’s recent job loss, find themselves pushed to the emotional brink by the arrival of their one time, political science professor.  This charismatic man seems to be living a life of active revolution and may be wanted by the authorities.  When the professor tries to re-ignite his once passionate affair with the wife, all three people are forced to make comic and dangerous choices.

Frederic Glover’s work has been performed at The Workshop Theater, The Independent Theater, Jewish Repertory Theater, Rembiko Theater, and the Provincetown Theater Company.  Awards: Tribute productions Sprenger-Lang Award, New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship, National Playwrights Conference at the O’Neill Center.

PLAY COMPETITION  FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

FIRST AWARD TO:

I’M NOT NOTHING by Kathy Kafer of Pelham, NYA fourteen-year old girl must deal with her mother’s abandonment of the family (having realized she was a lesbian) confronts her loss and the onslaught of adolescent sex.  The girl wonders if she is gay, too, setting off a series of comedic encounters with her friends and classmates.  In the end, the girl finally reconciles with her mother.

Kathy Kafer’s plays have been produced in NY, the Abingdon Theater, Algonquin Theater, Altered Stages, Blueberry Pond Theatre, Lamb’s Theatre.  Awards: finalist in the 2007 Nantucket Short Play Contest, finalist in the 2005 Stanley Drama, Dorothy Silver and Writer’s Digest competitions.  A former journalist of freelance articles for the New York Times, she now teaches at the S.A.R. Academy in Riverdale, N.Y.

SECOND AWARD TO:

PROM NIGHT by Sylvia Davenport-Veith of Oxford, GAA play about an awkward girl, Imena, who escapes the unwanted advances of her drunken prom date and runs into the woods. There she runs into the H.S. football captain and Prom King who is fighting with his drunken date.  She pathetically passes out.  The Prom King and Imena start to share their deepest secrets.  He begins a romance with this uncool girl. Together they create their own romantic Prom Night magic. 

Sylvia Davenport-Veith  earned a BFA in Theatre and M.Ed. in English Education from the University of Florida.  In Atlanta, Georgia she taught theatre and directed plays at Shiloh High School (a.k.a. Shiloh Onstage) in Snellville.  She is a member of the following organizations:  The Dramatists Guild of America; The American Screenwriter’s Association; The American Alliance for Theatre and Education; Working Title Playwrights; and Atlanta Stage Write Productions.  Prom Night, published by Theatrefolk, will be available in the Fall of 2008.

HONORABLE MENTION

NEVER EVER LAND  by Rosemary Zibart of Santa Fe, NM.

PADDY AND THE MERMAID by Donna Latham of St. Charles, IL.

I HATE SHAKESPEARE  by Steph Deferie of Harwich, MA.

KATRINA: THE GIRL WHO WANTED HER NAME BACK  by Jason Tremblay of Austin, TX.
 


WINNERS FOR 2006


THE JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD COMPETITION

FIRST AWARD TO:

Violet Sharp by William Cameron of Washington, Pennsylvania.  Based on a true story, Violet, a 27-year-old British domestic in the employ of Charles Lindbergh’s family, raises the suspicions of Harry Walsh, a police captain investigating the kidnapping of the Lindberghs’ infant son. Having initially lied to the police as to her whereabouts on the night of the crime, Violet strives to clear her name but only manages to strengthen Walsh’s conviction that she is guilty.  As Walsh rigorously pursues a confession, it becomes clear that Violet is being pursued just as fervently by her own personal demons.

William Cameron is the founding chair of the Theatre and Communication Department at Washington & Jefferson College.  He is entering his 20th year of teaching and has directed over 40 productions at W&J.  His comedy “Thespians” received Honorable Mention at the McLaren Comedy Playwrighting Competition and was the winner of the Midwest Regional Playwrights’ Competition.  His plays have been produced at the Source Theatre in Washingdon, DC, The Pittsburgh New Works Festival, and the Rochester Civic Theatre in Minnesota.  As an actor, he has appeared on stage and in nearly 20 feature and television films.

 SECOND AWARD TO:

Darwin at Down by Gino Dilorio of New York City, New York.   It is during the Spring of 1849, and Charles Darwin is in the beginning stages of his famous book, “On the Origin of Species.” Egged on by his colleague Joseph Hooker, Darwin is afraid of being scooped by other scientists working on the same problem. But his wife is afraid that God will smite Darwin and his family for publishing such a controversial theory. When Annie, Darwin’s young daughter, contracts a serious illness, Charles begins to wonder if publishing these theories is worth the ultimate cost.

Gino Dilorio’s  plays have been produced at the New Jersey Repertory Theatre, Urban Stages Theatre, Penguin Rep, the Turnip Theatre Company, the Metropolitan Theatre, and the Abymill Theatre, in Fethard, Ireland. “The Hard Way” won 1st place in the BBC’s 2005 International Playwrighting Competition. Other awards include Urban Stages’ Emerging Playwrights Award and the Berrilla Kerr Award.

THIRD AWARD TO:

The Bohemian Quartet by L. J. Schneiderman of Del Mar, California.   Four string players try to rehearse while waiting for the phone call telling them whether they have been chosen to be finalists in the career-launching Naumberg competition  But all sorts of personal difficulties interfere among the four musicians such as: the male second violinist awaits the imminent arrival of four premature babies; the cellist is repeatedly badgered by her ex-husband about their children.  In the end, the phone, which has interrupted them again and again with news from the outside world--but not news from the Naumberg—rings.  What is the news this time, bad or good?  Instead of answering, they let it ring and defiantly plunge into the long-delayed rehearsal.

L. J. Schneiderman received a B.A. in English Literature from Yale University, a M.D. from Harvard Medical School.  Besides a published novel and short stories (Pushcart Prize nomination), he has written thirteen full-length and five one-act plays.  He has had productions and staged readings at several theatres, including the Soho Poly in London, A.C.T. and the Julian Theatre in San Francisco, the Mark Taper, Cast Theatre, and the Connecticut Stratford Shakespeare Festival Theater.  His play, Screwball, was given a full production at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, California, and won a Drama-Logue award.



PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE
MARILYN HALL AWARDS

FIRST AWARD TO:

Falling from Trees by David Moberg of Port St. Lucie, Florida   A realistic picture of six teenagers facing significant challenges to their identities and their futures without the help of their parents, who should be like the trees that surround the children with wisdom and protection.  But when one parent dies, one parent disowns, one parent deserts, the young people are compelled to seek comfort and support from each other and discover their own personal courage.

David Moberg has directed, performed and taught theatre in Florida since 1981.  As Chair of Indian River Community College, he has directed over 200 main stage and touring productions.  He received a BA in theatre from Moorhead State University and his MFA in Acting/Directing from the University of Florida.  He is a recent recipient of the Florida Theatre Distinguished Career Award in the college/university division.

SECOND AWARD TO:

Another Happy Ending by Kenneth Buswell of Roslindale, Massachusetts. Welcome to the confusing world of middle school popularity.  Chill likes Poor, but he can’t be seen with her because she’s too low in the school popularity rankings.  Misfit, who tries so hard, is wary of Flirt’s sudden friendliness.  Rebel fights the system.  New tries to make friends.  Panic’s ranking is falling fast.  Friendships are destroyed as students do whatever it takes to rise to the top of the rankings.  But don’t worry—everything will end happily.  It always does in middle school theater. 

Ken Buswell is a middle school math teacher working in the Boston area. Along with thirteen students, he founded the Brown Theater Experience, an ensemble middle school actors that produced original plays which dealt with middle school life in honest, thought-provoking and innovative ways.  This play was the ensemble's final play.
 

HONORABLE MENTION

A Forgotten Treasure by Ann Marie Kennedy

Hamlet’s Ghost by Lawrence DuKore

Mirror Image by Harry Rosenbluth

John Henry by John Hardy

Slippery Joe by Patrick McIntyre

Seventy Years in Irish Mist by Joseph P. McDonald

CALIFORNIA MUSICAL THEATRE COMPETITION
 

Lost in Hollywoodland Book and Lyrics by Alex Wexler of Los Angeles, CA

Music by Bill Parsley


WINNERS FOR 2005


JULIE HARRIS PLAYWRIGHT AWARD COMPETITION 

First Place to:

The Organist by Mark Eisman of New York, NY

Second Place to:

Motherhouse by Victor Lodato of Tuson, AZ

Third Place to:

World Enough and Time by Maurice Weinblatt of Minneapolis, MN


PLAY COMPETITION FOR YOUTH THEATRE

MARILYN HALL AWARDS 

First Place to:

The Legend of Wenceslas by Walt Vail of Pitman, NJ

Second Place to:

The Goose Girl
by Gary L. Blackwood of Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia, Canada

Third Place to:

Aesop x Five
 by Robert R. Lehan of Westfield, MA


CALIFORNIA MUSICAL THEATRE COMPETITION

First Place to:

Campaign of the Century book by Robert L. Freedman of Sherman Oaks, CA, 
Music by Steven Lutvak of New York, NY.  Lyrics by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak.
 

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